icpmr.gif (1844 bytes) NSW Arbovirus Surveillance & Vector Monitoring Program nswhealt.gif (3086 bytes)

Mosquito Photos 
Coquillettidia & Mansonia Adults & Larvae

bottom of page

Coquillettidia linealis

Coquillettidia linealis

A female Coquillettidia linealis. This is a common species from southeastern Australia with distinctive golden stripes on its thorax. It breeds in permenant vegetated freshwaters and can be a serious nuisance pest around its breeding areas. For more information, go to the Coquillettidia linealis Fact Sheet.

Coquillettidia linealis larvae

The larvae of Coquillettidia linealis have a modified siphon, designed to pierce plant material, from where they gain their oxygen.

Coquillettidia linealis larvae siphon

A closeup of the modified siphon.

Coquillettidia linealis larvae head

A closeup of the head of Coquillettidia linealis while feeding showing the mouth brushes.

Coquilettidia linealis pupa

The pupa of Coquillettidia linealis, showing how the larval trumpets also tap into root systems.

Egg raft

Coquillettidia linealis lay their eggs in rafts, which float on the water surface. The larvae hatch out from underneath the raft. The caps (operculum) indicates that the larvae have already hatched from this raft.

 

Coquillettidia xanthogaster

Coquillettidia xanthogaster adult

This is a very distinctive mosquito of orange appearance. Larvae breed in swamps, lagoons and creeks. This species is a major pest in many parts of northern Australia but is only occasionally collected in northern NSW. Susceptible to Ross River infection in the laboratory although vector status is unknown.

Coquillettidia xanthogaster adult bloodfed

The same mosquito, almost fully blood engorged.
Egg raft Like Coquillettidia linealis above, Coquillettidia xanthogaster lays their eggs in rafts.

 

Mansonia uniformis

Mansonia uniformis adult This mid-sized mosquito occurs throughout much of Australia and is common in both the coastal and inland regions of New South Wales. It can be a major nuisance pest in northern parts of Australia. For more information, go to the Mansonia uniformis Fact Sheet.
Mansonia uniformis adult almost fully engorged The same mosquito, almost fully blood engorged.
Mansonia uniformis larvae Mansonia larvae have a modified siphon designed to pierce plant material from where they gain their oxygen, normally the larvae do not rest at the surface as in this image.
Mansonia uniformis larvae Larvae of Mansonia uniformis attached to plant roots.
Mansonia uniformis pupa The pupa of Mansonia uniformis. Like the larvae, the pupa have modified trumpets for piercing plant materials to gain their oxygen. They normally only rest on the water surface like this just before emerging.
Mansonia uniformis eggs The eggs of Mansonia uniformis are layed in a raft usually attached to plant material.

 

Mansonia septempunctata

Mansonia septempunctata adult This Mansonia species occurs in northern Queensland and can be a pest species.
Mansonia septempunctata larvae Like Coquillettidia, Mansonia larvae have a modified siphon designed to pierce plant material from where they gain their oxygen.
Mansonia septempunctata larvae siphon A closeup of the siphon, which is attached to a plant root.


top of page