NSW Arbovirus Surveillance & Vector Monitoring Program
The Other Mosquitoes
of Southeastern Australia
Aedeomyia catasticta Ad. venustipes Aedes aculeatus Ae. alboannulatus Ae. alternans
Ae. australis Ae. bancroftianus Ae. biocellatus Ae. burpengaryensis Ae. camptorhynchus
Ae. dobrotworskyi Ae. eidsvoldensis Ae. flavifrons Ae. funereus Ae. gahnicola
Ae. imperfectus Ae. kochi Ae. lineatopennis Ae. mallochi Ae. multiplex
Ae. normanensis Ae. notoscriptus Ae. palmarum Ae. procax Ae. pseudonormanensis
Ae. rubrithorax Ae. rupestris Ae. sagax Ae. sapiens Ae. theobaldi
Ae. tremulus Ae. vigilax Ae. vittiger Ae. wattensis Ae. sp. Marks' no. 51
Ae. sp. Marks' no. 52 Ae. sp. Marks' no.71 Ae. sp. Marks' no.85 Anopheles amictus An. annulipes
An. atratipes An. bancroftii An. pseudostigmaticus An. stigmaticus Coquillettidia linealis
Cq. variegata Cq. xanthogaster Culex annulirostris Cx. australicus Cx. bitaeniorhynchus
Cx. cylindricus Cx. edwardsi Cx. fergusoni Cx. globocoxitus Cx. halifaxii
Cx. orbostiensis Cx. molestus Cx. palpalis Cx. postspiraculosus Cx.pseudomelanoconia
Cx. quinquefasciatus Cx. sitiens Cx. squamosus Cx. starkae Cx. sp. Marks’ no. 32
Culiseta antipodea Cs. inconspicua Cs. weindorferi Mansonia uniformis Mimomyia elegans
Toxorhynchites speciosus Tripteroides atripes Tp. marksae Tp. tasmaniensis Uranotaenia lateralis
Ur. nivipes Ur. pygmaea      

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This list contains the less common mosquitoes that have been collected during the course of the Program. For more information on the species below consult the following texts:

Dobrotworsky, N.V. (1965). The Mosquitoes of Victoria. Melbourne University Press, London.

Lee et al. (1980-1989). The Culicidae of the Australasian Region. Vols 1-12. Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra.

Russell, R.C. (1996). A Colour Photo Atlas of Mosquitoes of Southeastern Australia. Department of Medical Entomology, Westmead Hospital and the University of Sydney. 194pp.

Russell, R.C. (1993). Mosquitoes and Mosquito-Borne Disease in Southeastern Australia. Revised edition. Department of Medical Entomology, Westmead Hospital. xii + 310pp.

 

The Mosquitoes (C = Coastal, I = Inland)

All mosquito photographs are to scale unless otherwise indicated. To see all the mosquitoes together on the same scale click here!  (note that this is a very large image).

Following a recent taxonomic revision of the genus Aedes and its subgenera, several subgenera have been raised to generic rank. The new names follow the old in brackets. For a complete list of the new names, click here.

Aedeomyia catasticta (C & I): A rare species for NSW, only having been collected in the northern most inland and coastal sites. Vector/pest status unknown.

Aedeomyia venustipes (C): an uncommon small mosquito, the larvae breeding in permanent swamps and ground pools. Vector/pest status unknown. (Photo).

Aedes aculeatus [Ochlerotatus aculeatus] (C): a rare species, only collected from coastal regions north of Port Stephens. Vector/pest status unknown. (Photo).

Aedes alboannulatus [Ochlerotatus alboannulatus] (C & I): a commonly collected mosquito particularly early or late in the mosquito season. The larvae breed in bushland ground pools and creekline rockpools. Can be a pest in bushland areas, not known to transmit arboviruses. (Photo).

Aedes alternans [Ochlerotatus alternans] (C & I): see "Aedes alternans" Fact sheet. (Photo).

Aedes australis [Ochlerotatus australis] (C): very common along coastal areas where they breed in rock pools (especially on sandstone) above the high tide mark. Rarely bites humans in NSW. (Photo).

Aedes bancroftianus [Ochlerotatus bancroftianus] (C & I): Common mosquito in inland regions and can be a nuisance after flooding or extensive rain. Several viruses including Ross River & Barmah Forest have been isolated from this mosquito, but it is not known if they can transmit to humans. (Photo).

Aedes biocellatus [Ochlerotatus biocellatus] (C): A mosquito that is only very rarely collected in the program. Vector/pest status unknown.

Aedes burpengaryensis [Ochlerotatus burpengaryensis] (C): an uncommon mosquito collected in coastal regions. Vector/pest status unknown. (Photo).

Aedes camptorhynchus [Ochlerotatus camptorhynchus] (C & I): see "Aedes camptorhynchus" Fact Sheet.   (Photo).

Aedes dobrotworskyi [Ochlerotatus dobrotworskyi] (C): uncommon only collected from the south coast of NSW. No information available on vector/pest status.

Aedes eidsvoldensis [Ochlerotatus eidsvoldensis] (C & I): mainly collected in inland areas of NSW and is moderately uncommon. Very similar in appearance to Aedes theobaldi. Several viruses including Ross River & Murray Valley Encephalitis have been isolated from this mosquito, but it is not known if they can transmit to humans.

Aedes flavifrons [Ochlerotatus flavifrons] (C): a large common mosquito with a distinctive patch on the wings. Breeds in bushland groundpools and can be a nuisance biter. Ross River has been isolated from this species but is thought not to be a major pest. (Photo).

Aedes funereus [Verrallina funerea] (C): breeds in brackish groundpools often in association with Aedes vigilax. Can be a serious pest biter in and close to mangrove but tends not to fly far from these areas. Ross River & Barmah Forest have been isolated from this species. (Photo).

Aedes gahnicola [Ochlerotatus gahnicola] (C): reasonably uncommon mosquito that breeds in leaf axils. Adults can be a pest near its breeding source. No information is shown on its ability to transmit arboviruses. Very similar to Aedes kochi. (Photo).

Aedes imperfectus [Ochlerotatus imperfectus] (C): fairly uncommon species, which breed in grassy groundpools. Rarely a pest problem and not known to transmit arboviruses.

Aedes kochi [Ochlerotatus kochi] (C): reasonably uncommon attractive mosquito that breeds in leaf axils. Adults can be a pest near its breeding source. No information is known on its ability to transmit arboviruses. Very similar to Aedes gahnicola. (Photo).

Aedes lineatopennis [Ochlerotatus lineatopennis] (C): rarely collected and when so, mainly from the north areas of the coast of NSW. Breeds in transient, rainfilled grass pools. Known to be a vicious biter of humans but unlikely to be a serious vector in NSW due to it being uncommon. (Photo).

Aedes mallochi [Ochlerotatus mallochi] (C & I): a species which is occasionally collected from various localities of NSW. Similar in appearance to Aedes notoscriptus but does not have a band around the proboscis. It is a tree hole breeder that has been recorded biting humans although the vector status is unknown. (Photo).

Aedes multiplex [Ochlerotatus multiplex] (C): rarely collected in big numbers and thus not often a pest. Breeds in shaded groundpools. Vector status unknown. (Photo).

Aedes normanensis [Ochlerotatus normanensis] (C & I): uncommonly collected in NSW and only from the northern areas and mostly from the inland. Common in northern Australia where it is a major pest species and several viruses have been isolated from this species including Ross River, Barmah Forest and Murray Valley Encephalitis. Breeds in temporary groundpools. (Photo).

Aedes notoscriptus [Ochlerotatus notoscriptus] (C & I): see "Aedes notoscriptus" Fact Sheet. (Photo).

Aedes palmarum [Ochlerotatus palmarum] (C): collected in only the northern coastal areas of the state and rarely so. Often found breeding in fallen palm frons. Known to bite humans close to breeding sites. Vector status unknown. (Photo).

Aedes procax [Ochlerotatus procax] (C): a common species in coastal areas and breeds in bushland groundpools. Can be a minor pest in its breeding area and Ross River & Barmah Forest has been isolated from this species. Vector status unknown. (Photo).

Aedes pseudonormanensis [Ochlerotatus pseudonormanensis] (I): similar in appearance to Aedes normanensis and to date has only been collected from northern inland regions of NSW after heavy flooding. Vector status unknown.

Aedes rubrithorax [Ochlerotatus rubrithorax] (C & I): more common from coastal NSW than inland where it breeds in a variety of groundpools and creekline rockpools. Can be a pest in some bushland areas where it breeds. Vector status unknown. (Photo).

Aedes rupestris [Ochlerotatus rupestris] (C): rarely collected in the Program. Breeds along creeklines and rarely a pest problem. Vector status unknown. (Photo).

Aedes sagax [Ochlerotatus sagax] (I): a large mosquito from inland regions and tends to be a major pest after flooding in summer and autumn. Ross River has been isolated from Aedes sagax and it has been shown to be capable of carrying Murray Valley Encephalitis in the laboratory, although its vector status is unknown. (Photo).

Aedes sapiens [Ochlerotatus sapiens] (I): a rare species being collected only from Wentworth in the inland south of the state. It is similar in appearance to Aedes eidsvoldensis but Aedes sapiens does not have banded tarsi. Little is known about its ecology and vector/pest status is  unknown. (Photo).

Aedes theobaldi [Ochlerotatus theobaldi] (C& I):see "Aedes theobaldi" fact sheet. (Photo).

Aedes tremulus [Ochlerotatus tremulus] (I): a small dark species and rarely collected in NSW. It is a pest in WA where several arboviruses have been isolated from the mosquito such as Ross River, Kunjin & Murray Valley Encephalitis. (Photo).

Aedes vigilax [Ochlerotatus vigilax] (C & I): see "Aedes vigilax" fact sheet. (Photo).

Aedes vittiger [Ochlerotatus vittiger] (C & I): see "Aedes vittiger" fact sheet. (Photo).

Aedes wattensis [Ochlerotatus wattensis] (I): an uncommon very small, stoutly built mosquito. Little is known about its ecology. Vector/pest status also unknown. (Photo).

Aedes sp. Marks’ no. 51 [Ochlerotatus sp. Marks’ no. 51] (C): a similar species to Aedes procax and is also collected along coastal regions. Little is known about its ecology. Vector/pest status also unknown.

Aedes sp. Marks’ no. 52 [Verrallina sp. Marks’ no. 52] (C): collected occasionally from several coastal locations in NSW and similar to Aedes funereus. Has been found breeding in semi-permanent ground pools. Adults are known to bite humans, but is unlikely a serious vector. (Photo).

Aedes sp. Marks' no. 71 [Ochlerotatus sp. Marks' no. 71] (I): very similar in appearance to Aedes eidsvoldensis. This species has only been collected from northern inland regions of NSW after heavy flooding. Vector status unknown. (Photo).

Aedes sp. Marks' no. 85 [Ochlerotatus sp. Marks' no. 85] (I): a very rarely collected species from inland areas (and to date only from Deniliquin, Brewarrina and Wanaaring in the Program). It is very similar in appearance to Aedes sagax. (Photo).

Anopheles amictus (I): occasionally collected from inland NSW only. Larvae breed in a variety of groundpools. Ross River has been isolated from this species in Northern Queensland but is unlikely to be an important vector in south eastern Australia due to its low numbers. (Photo).

Anopheles annulipes (C & I): see "Anopheles annulipes" Fact Sheet. (Photo).

Anopheles atratipes (C): collected occasionally from most coastal monitoring sites and occasionally bite humans near larval habitat of ground pools. Vector status unknown. (Photo).

Anopheles bancroftii (C): a very distinctive Anopheles being extremely dark in appearance. Collected only from the northern most locations of coastal NSW and is only rarely trapped. Vector status unknown. (Photo Note that this image is not on the same scale as the other mosquitoes).

Anopheles pseudostigmaticus (C): a very uncommonly collected mosquito, which appears not to bite people. Vector status unknown. (Photo).

Anopheles stigmaticus (C): similar in appearance to Anopheles pseudostigmaticus and collected from northern NSW coastal sites only. Adults are not attracted to humans and vector status is unknown.

Coquillettidia linealis (C & I): see "Coquillettidia linealis" Fact Sheet. (Photo).

Coquillettidia variegata (C): occasionally collected mainly from the north coast of NSW. Vector/pest status also unknown. (Photo).

Coquillettidia xanthogaster (C & I): a very distinctive mosquito of orange appearance. Larvae breed in swamps, lagoons and creeks. This species is a major pest in many parts of northern Australia but is only occasionally collected in northern NSW. Susceptible to Ross River infection in the laboratory although vector status is unknown. (Photo).

Culex annulirostris (C & I): see "Culex annulirostris" Fact Sheet. (Photo).

Culex australicus (C & I): see "Culex australicus" Fact Sheet. (Photo).

Culex bitaeniorhynchus (C): similar to Culex annulirostris and Culex sitiens although Culex bitaeniorhychus has apical bands on the tergites. Uncommonly collected in NSW and despite Murray Valley Encephalitis having been isolated from this species elsewhere in Australia, it is probably not an important vector in south eastern Australia. (Photo).

Culex cylindricus (C & I): collected occasionally and mainly from inland NSW. Breeds in vegetated groundpools. Similar in appearance to Culex orbostiensis. Rarely bites humans and vector status unknown. (Photo).

Culex edwardsi (C): rarely collected and only from northern coastal NSW. Breeds in grassy swampy areas. Tends not to bite humans and unlikely to be involved in the transmission of viruses in NSW due to its low numbers. (Photo).

Culex fergusoni (C): A rarely collected mosquito from coastal NSW. Breeds in goundpools and rockpools. Vector/pest status unknown, but not likely a significant vector due to its low numbers in areas collected.

Culex globocoxitus (C & I): Very rarely collected in most of NSW, although regularly captured in Wentworth in the far south west of the state, where it becomes more common in southern Australia. The larvae have been found in swamps and groundpools. Similar in appearance to Culex australicus. Not likely to be an important vector as it rarely bites humans. (Photo).

Culex halifaxii (C): a large brownish mosquito, which breeds in a variety of habitats in association with other mosquito species as the larval stage is predacious on other mosquito larvae. Vector status not known and rarely bites humans. (Photo).

Culex orbostiensis (C): collected occasionally and only from coastal NSW. Breeds in vegetated groundpools. Similar in appearance to Culex cylindricus. Uncommonly bites humans. Vector status unknown.

Culex molestus (C & I): see "Culex molestus" Fact Sheet. (Photo).

Culex palpalis (C): not often collected in NSW. Larvae are associated with surface aquatic plants. Kunjin has been isolated from this species in Qld, but due to its rarity in NSW, would unlikely be a significant vector.

Culex postspiraculosus (C): an uncommonly collected mosquito from coastal NSW. The larvae are found in vegetated groundpools. Vector status unknown, not known to attack humans. (Photo).

Culex pseudomelanoconia (C): are dark species that does not have any banding on the abdomen. Rarely bites human and not very often collected. Vector status unknown.

Culex quinquefasciatus (C & I): see "Culex quinquefasciatus" Fact Sheet. (Photo).

Culex sitiens (C): a series pest in some coastal areas of northern NSW, as well as QLD and NT. Typically breeds in brackish pools formed by high tides and rainfall. They often do not venture far from the breeding sites in NSW and, although shown to be able to transmit Ross River in the laboratory, are thought not to be an important vector. (Photo).

Culex squamosus (C): more common in northern areas of Australia and only rarely collected along the north coast of NSW. Breeds in a variety of goundpools in association with filamentous algae. Tends not to bite humans. Kunjin has been isolated from this species in Qld, although would unlikely be a serious vector in NSW due to its low numbers. (Photo).

Culex starckae (I): a banded proboscus Culex species, similar to Culex annulirostris. This is a rare species. Known to bite humans but vector status unknown.

Culex sp. Marks’ no. 32 (C): occasionally collected from various coastal regions of the state. Tends to breed in groundpools with edge vegetation. Vector/pest status unknown. (Photo).

Culiseta antipodea (C): a very dark mosquito that is not often collected in traps. Breeds in tea tree swamps and semi-permanent pools. This species does not attack humans.

Culiseta inconspicua (C & I): a rarely collected mosquito in NSW, that very rarely bites humans. Vector status unknown. (Photo).

Culiseta weindorferi (I): a rarely collected mosquito in NSW, and is known to occasionally bite humans. This species is adapted to cold conditions. Vector status unknown.

Mansonia uniformis (C & I): see "Mansonia uniformis" Fact Sheet. (Photo).

Mimomyia elegans (C): known from northern NSW and is rarely collected. Vector status unknown. (Photo).

Toxorhynchites speciosus (C): see "Toxorhynchites speciosus" Fact Sheet. (Photo).

Tripteroides atripes (C & I): collected occasionally from both inland and coastal NSW, this species breeds in both natural and artificial containers. Can be a nuisance pest in some rural areas although vector status unknown. (Photo).

Tripteroides marksae (C): a smallish mosquito with a very long proboscis, and is rarely captured. Larvae breed in both natural and artificial containers. Adults are known to attack humans but rarely are they considered a serious pest. Vector status unknown.

Tripteroides tasmaniensis (C): an uncommon species that breeds in natural and artificial containers. Adults are known to attack humans, mostly during the day, but rarely are they considered a serious pest. Vector status unknown. (Photo).

Uranotaenia lateralis (C): a small rare species, that breeds in a variety of habitats. Not known to bite humans or transmit viruses.(Photo). Note this photograph is not to the same scale as the other mosquitoes.

Uranotaenia nivipes (C): a very small and rarely collected mosquito. Not known to bite humans or transmit viruses. Note the distinctive white stripe on the side of the thorax. (Photo). Not to scale.

Uranotaenia pygmaea (C): a very small and rarely collected mosquito. These mosquitoes bite frogs and thus pose no direct concern to humans. (Photo). Note this photograph is not to the same scale as the other mosquitoes.

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